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The Academy Awards

Genres: Award Shows, Specials
Broadcast on: M-Net

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Seasons

Season 82

Channel Premiere Finale TX Time Episodes
ABC 07 Mar 2010 07 Mar 2010 Sunday, 20h30 - 00h00 1
M-Net 08 Mar 2010 08 Mar 2010 Monday, 19h30 - 22h30 1


Season 82

The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are presented annually by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences to recognise excellence of professionals in the film industry, including directors, actors and writers, for the preceding year.

The first Academy Awards ceremony was held on Thursday 16 May 1929, at the Hotel Roosevelt in Hollywood to honour outstanding film achievements of 1927 and 1928. It was hosted by actor Douglas Fairbanks and director William C. DeMille.

The Academy Awards traditionally air live in South Africa on one of DStv's movie channels, with a delayed broadcast airing on the same night on M-Net.

The 82nd Academy Awards ceremony took place on Sunday 7 March, 2010. Held at the Kodak Theatre in Hollywood, California, the awards were hosted by Alec Baldwin and Steve Martin.

The 82nd Academy Awards aired in South Africa on M-Net on Monday 8 March, at 19h30. The ceremony was three hours long.

2010 Winners

Best Picture

Avatar
The Blind Side
District 9
An Education
The Hurt Locker
Inglourious Basterds
Precious
A Serious Man
Up
Up in the Air

Best Director

James Cameron (Avatar)
Kathryn Bigelow (The Hurt Locker)
Quentin Tarantino (Inglourious Basterds)
Lee Daniels (Precious)
Jason Reitman (Up in the Air)

Best Actor

Jeff Bridges (Crazy Heart)
George Clooney (Up in the Air)
Colin Firth (A Single Man)
Morgan Freeman (Invictus)
Jeremy Renner (The Hurt Locker)

Best Actress

Sandra Bullock (The Blind Side)
Helen Mirren (The Last Station)
Carey Mulligan (An Education)
Gabourey Sidibe (Precious)
Meryl Streep (Julie and Julia)

Best Supporting Actor

Matt Damon (Invictus)
Woody Harrelson (The Messenger)
Christopher Plummer (The Last Station)
Stanley Tucci (The Lovely Bones)
Christoph Waltz (Inglourious Basterds)

Best Supporting Actress

Penelope Cruz (Nine)
Vera Farmiga (Up in the Air)
Maggie Gyllenhaal (Crazy Heart)
Anna Kendrick (Up in the Air)
Mo'Nique (Precious)

Best Foreign Language Film

Ajami (Israel)
El Secreto de Sus Ojos - The Secret of Their Eyes (Argentina)
The Milk of Sorrow (Peru)
Un Prophete - A Prophet (France)
The White Ribbon (Germany)

Best Original Screenplay

Mark Boal (The Hurt Locker)
Quentin Tarantino (Inglourious Basterds)
Alessandro Camon, Oren Moverman (The Messenger)
Joel Coen, Ethan Coen (A Serious Man)
Bob Peterson, Pete Docter, Tom McCarthy (Up)

Best Animated Feature

Coraline
Fantastic Mr Fox
The Princess and the Frog
The Secret of Kells
Up

Best Adapted Screenplay

Neill Blomkamp, Terri Tatchell (District 9)
Nick Hornby (An Education)
Jesse Armstrong, Simon Blackwell, Armando Iannucci, Tony Roche (In the Loop)
Geoffrey Fletcher (Precious)
Jason Reitman and Sheldon Turner (Up in the Air)

Best Art Direction

Avatar
The Imaginarium of Doctor Parnassus
Nine
Sherlock Holmes
The Young Victoria

Best Cinematography

Avatar
Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince
The Hurt Locker
Inglourious Basterds
The White Ribbon

Best Sound Mixing

Avatar
The Hurt Locker
Inglourious Basterds
Star Trek
Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen

Best Sound Editing

Avatar
The Hurt Locker
Inglourious Basterds
Star Trek
Up

Best Original Song

Almost There from The Princess and the Frog by Randy Newman
Down in New Orleans from The Princess and the Frog by Randy Newman
Loin de Paname from Paris 36 by Reinhardt Wagner, Frank Thomas
Take It All from Nine by Maury Yeston
The Weary Kind (theme from Crazy Heart) from Crazy Heart by Ryan Bingham, T Bone Burnett

Best Original Score

Avatar (James Horner)
Fantastic Mr Fox (Alexandre Desplat)
The Hurt Locker (Marco Beltrami and Buck Sanders)
Sherlock Holmes (Hans Zimmer)
Up (Michael Giacchino)

Best Costume Design

Bright Star
Coco Before Chanel
The Imaginarium of Doctor Parnassus
Nine
The Young Victoria

Best Documentary Feature

Burma VJ
The Cove
Food, Inc.
The Most Dangerous Man in America: Daniel Ellsberg and the Pentagon Papers
Which Way Home

Best Documentary Short

China's Unnatural Disaster: The Tears of Sichuan Province
The Last Campaign of Governor Booth Gardner
The Last Truck: Closing of a GM Plant
Music by Prudence
Rabbit a la Berlin

Best Film Editing

Avatar
District 9
The Hurt Locker
Inglourious Basterds
Precious

Best Make-Up

Il Divo
Star Trek
The Young Victoria

Best Animated Short Film

French Roast
Granny O'Grimm's Sleeping Beauty
The Lady and the Reaper (La Dama y la Muerte)
Logorama
A Matter of Loaf and Death

Best Live Action Short Film

The Door
Instead of Abracadabra
Kavi
Miracle Fish
The New Tenants

Best Visual Effects

Avatar
District 9
Star Trek

About the Awards

Far from the eagerly anticipated and globally televised event it is today, the first Academy Awards ceremony took place out of the public eye during an Academy banquet at the Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel.

Two hundred and seventy people attended the 16 May, 1929 dinner in the hotel's Blossom Room; guest tickets cost $5. It was a long affair filled with speeches, but Academy President Douglas Fairbanks made quick work of handing out the statuettes.

There was little suspense when the awards were presented that night: the recipients had already been announced three months earlier. That all changed the following year, however, when the Academy decided to keep the results secret until the ceremony but gave a list in advance to newspapers for publication at 11 p.m. on the night of the Awards.

This policy continued until 1940 when, much to the Academy's consternation, the Los Angeles Times broke the embargo and published the names of the winners in its evening edition – which was readily available to guests arriving for the ceremony. That prompted the Academy in 1941 to adopt the sealed-envelope system still in use today.

Fifteen statuettes were awarded at the first ceremony for cinematic achievements in 1927 and 1928. The first Best Actor winner was acclaimed German tragedian Emil Jannings, who had to return to Europe before the ceremony.

The Academy granted his request to receive the trophy early, making his statuette the very first Academy Award ever presented.

The first presentation was the only one to escape a media audience; by the second year, enthusiasm for the Awards was such that a Los Angeles radio station produced a live one-hour broadcast of the event. The ceremony has been broadcast ever since.

The Academy continued to hand out the awards at banquets – held at the Ambassador and Biltmore hotels – until 1942, when increased attendance made these dinner ceremonies impractical. Starting with the 16th Oscar ceremony, which was held at Grauman's Chinese Theatre in Hollywood, the event has always been held at a theatre.

In 1953, the first televised Oscar ceremony enabled millions throughout the United States and Canada to watch the proceedings. Broadcasting in colour began in 1966, affording home viewers a chance to fully experience the dazzling allure of the event.

Since 1969, the Oscar show has been broadcast internationally, now reaching movie fans in over 200 countries.


Season 82 Cast

as
Host - Himself

as
Host - Himself

as
Herself

as
Himself

as
Himself

as
Himself

as
Himself

as
Himself

as
Nominee - Herself

as
Nominee - Herself

as
Nominee - Herself

as
Nominee - Himself

as
Nominee - Himself

as
Nominee - Himself

as
Presenter - Herself

as
Presenter - Herself

as
Presenter - Herself

as
Presenter - Herself

as
Presenter - Herself

as
Presenter - Herself

as
Presenter - Herself

as
Presenter - Herself

as
Presenter - Herself

as
Presenter - Himself

as
Presenter - Himself

as
Presenter - Himself

as
Presenter - Himself

as
Presenter - Himself

as
Presenter - Himself

as
Presenter - Himself

as
Presenter - Himself

as
Presenter - Himself

as
Presenter - Himself

as
Presenter - Himself

as
Presenter - Himself

as
Presenter - Himself

as
Presenter - Himself

as
Presenter - Himself

as
Winner - Herself

as
Co-Presenter - Himself

as
Co-Presenter - Himself

as
Himself - Opening Number

as
Louis (voice)

as
John Hughes Tribute - Herself

as
Presenter - Herself

as
Co-Presenter: Best Actor in a Leading Role

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